Monday, November 18, 2013

What are you waiting for, get on to the Cloud and start developing with Visual Studio

On Nov 13 Microsoft announced Visual Studio online. Here is the announcement
Here is a screen shot from the site. There is a new portal that goes with it as well.

You guessed it right, you can get started for FREE. Of course it is free for MSDN users. You will see some screen shots at the bottom of this post.

The line-up of Online offering according to this source is as follows:

•Hosted source control, work-item and agile-planning services (in other words, the key capabilities of Team Foundation Service on Windows Azure)
•A hosted build service
•Elastic load testing service
•Application Insights -- a service that provides information such as health, availability, performance and usage of applications
•"Monaco" -- a coding environment "for the cloud, in the cloud," which provides a subset of Visual Studio features inside a variety of browsers for "targeted Azure development scenarios." The first of these scenarios is for editing Azure Web Sites directly from inside any "modern" browser, on any device (Windows-based or not). Microsoft has been working on Monaco for three years, execs said, and already has used the Monaco technology for some of its other cloud-based developer offerings, including the Office 365 "Napa" development tools, to SkyDrive file editing.

It is very easy to start even if you do not have a subscription for Windows Azure.

I have one and I could do it in no time at all. Here are some easy steps I took to create a VS project online. Probably you will hear a lot more from me in the comign days. Right now I am somewhat busy.

After signing up look up Visual Studio Online marked Preview

I am impatient, I clicked Quick Create with the lightning icon after giving an account name. I got a URL for this

I clicked Create Account.  Very quickly an account was created.

I clicked on Browse to create a project and provided some details..

Clicked on Create Project. The project got created.
Now you can connect to it using Visual Studio, Eclipse or XCode.
What is unusual is that this required java to develop (Not C#, not even C++).
What a shame?
Read this article by Mary Jo Foley on ZDNet here. Here is a summary of Mary Jo's article:
Summary: What's the former technical lead on Eclipse Java development tools been doing at Microsoft for the past three years? Building a browser-based development toolset.

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